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What hospitals will look like by 2040, according to medical tech CEO

Jessica Yun

The New Investors video series brought to you by Yahoo Finance reveals the secrets of the most successful entrepreneurs and business people in Australia today. This is part of the second episode of the second season.

Artificial intelligence (AI) will touch our lives in several ways, from voice-activated personal assistants to self-driving cars to Amazon and Netflix’s algorithms that suggests movies and products to us based on what we already like.

And according to the CEO of medical device company Halo Medical Devices, AI and robotics will hit the medical industry, too.

By 2040, AI and robotics will bring patients a more personalised experience and completely change the way they’re cared for.

“[Hospitals] are going to be less crowded because AI and robotics are not just going to be in the halls of the hospitals, they’re going to be at home,” she told Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief and New Investors – My Story host Sarah O’Carroll.

Halo Medical Device CEO Hayley Warren chats to Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief and New Investors – My Story host Sarah O'Carroll.
Halo Medical Device CEO Hayley Warren speaks to Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief and New Investors – My Story host Sarah O'Carroll. (Source: Yahoo Finance)

The technology will have the effect of “de-clogging” and taking pressure off healthcare by ‘de-centralising’ it, or shifting it away from hospitals, she explained.

“So, walking in… The patient experience is going to be hugely changed,” Warren said.

In the healthcare industry, people rate being heard and understood as their number one focus, she added. But how will that be delivered?

With the use of AI and robotics, patients – from elderly people to concerned parents sitting in the emergency department – will be better heard, and the next triage and healthcare move can be determined with the help of data gathered through sophisticated technology.

But wouldn’t artificial intelligence and robotic technology take away from the patient experience, and serve as an obstacle rather than a tool to being heard?

According to Warren, not necessarily.

“The problem with the healthcare system is: it's so busy,” she said. “So a doctor doesn't have the time, the nurse doesn't have the time – I've been on that side, I understand – to sit and talk to people.

“So if we can find a humanised way to interact and get that same information – and you see such huge advances in AI to interact in such a humanised way – it'll feel like you're interacting with a doctor or a nurse.”

This kind of technology will assist the elderly in their homes, or those who may benefit from having their mental health monitored, she said.

The New Investors video series brought to you by Yahoo Finance reveals the secrets of the most successful entrepreneurs and business people in Australia today. This is part of the second episode of the second season.

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