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Half of Aussies are ready to quit their jobs in 2023

Many Aussies are considering a job change and feeling confident they can secure a new position.

Australian workers in the city. Job concept.
More than half of Aussie workers are considering switching jobs in 2023. (Source: Getty)

Aussie workers are feeling confident about quitting their job for another one, despite a slowdown in hiring.

New data from LinkedIn revealed 59 per cent of Aussie workers were considering a switch from their current job this year, and 56 per cent were confident about securing a new role. That’s despite a 19 per cent year-on-year decline in hiring.

While 60 per cent of the 1,003 workers surveyed said they were happy in their current role, they were still ready to jump ship if it meant more money (40 per cent) and better work-life balance (31 per cent).

The uncertain economic environment is also causing problems for some workers. More than a quarter (27 per cent) of workers said they were now working longer hours and taking on more responsibilities, while two thirds (66 per cent) felt overworked and undervalued.

“Australians are not putting their careers on the backseat despite the uncertain environment, and are instead driving forward, trusting their abilities and looking to grow their careers,” LinkedIn career expert Cayla Dengate said.

“Since the pandemic, it’s clear professionals have built up a bank of resilience and we’re seeing this in their confidence to tackle the year ahead. Many are still looking for a job that works for them, with a wage that matches their value and a role that offers work-life balance and flexibility.”

Four-day work weeks to retain staff

The top way to retain staff was to offer them a four-day work week, LinkedIn found, with more than a third (35 per cent) of workers mentioning it would inspire them to stay in their job.

For staff who had already left a job, more than half (54 per cent) said they did so due to a bad boss, while just under half (48 per cent) said it was due to a lack of leadership.

It comes as bosses get increasingly creative to lure in new workers, with free rent, accommodation and food just some of the perks being offered.

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