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If You Had Bought DGR Global (ASX:DGR) Shares Three Years Ago You'd Have Made 350%

Simply Wall St

Generally speaking, investors are inspired to be stock pickers by the potential to find the big winners. You won't get it right every time, but when you do, the returns can be truly splendid. For example, the DGR Global Limited (ASX:DGR) share price is up a whopping 350% in the last three years, a handsome return for long term holders. It's also good to see the share price up 13% over the last quarter. But this move may well have been assisted by the reasonably buoyant market (up 6.3% in 90 days).

View our latest analysis for DGR Global

DGR Global recorded just AU$3,276,518 in revenue over the last twelve months, which isn't really enough for us to consider it to have a proven product. As a result, we think it's unlikely shareholders are paying much attention to current revenue, but rather speculating on growth in the years to come. For example, investors may be hoping that DGR Global finds some valuable resources, before it runs out of money.

We think companies that have neither significant revenues nor profits are pretty high risk. You should be aware that there is always a chance that this sort of company will need to issue more shares to raise money to continue pursuing its business plan. While some companies like this go on to deliver on their plan, making good money for shareholders, many end in painful losses and eventual de-listing. Of course, if you time it right, high risk investments like this can really pay off, as DGR Global investors might know.

DGR Global had net debt of AU$48,605,920 when it last reported in December 2018, according to our data. That puts it in the highest risk category, according to our analysis. So we're surprised to see the stock up 65% per year, over 3 years, but we're happy for holders. Investors must really like its potential. The image below shows how DGR Global's balance sheet has changed over time; if you want to see the precise values, simply click on the image.

ASX:DGR Historical Debt, April 22nd 2019

It can be extremely risky to invest in a company that doesn't even have revenue. There's no way to know its value easily. One thing you can do is check if company insiders are buying shares. It's often positive if so, assuming the buying is sustained and meaningful. You can click here to see if there are insiders buying.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We've already covered DGR Global's share price action, but we should also mention its total shareholder return (TSR). The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings and spin-offs. DGR Global hasn't been paying dividends, but its TSR of 350% exceeds its share price return of 350%, implying it has either spun-off a business, or raised capital at a discount; thereby providing additional value to shareholders.

A Different Perspective

It's nice to see that DGR Global shareholders have received a total shareholder return of 48% over the last year. Since the one-year TSR is better than the five-year TSR (the latter coming in at 34% per year), it would seem that the stock's performance has improved in recent times. Given the share price momentum remains strong, it might be worth taking a closer look at the stock, lest you miss an opportunity. You could get a better understanding of DGR Global's growth by checking out this more detailed historical graph of earnings, revenue and cash flow.

For those who like to find winning investments this free list of growing companies with recent insider purchasing, could be just the ticket.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on AU exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.