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Former AMP chair in spotlight at CCA AGM

Simone Ziaziaris
Former AMP chairman Catherine Brenner faces further strife ahead of Coca-Cola Amatil's AGM

Catherine Brenner is facing calls to step down from the Coca-Cola Amatil board at the beverage giant's annual general meeting, with the pressure still on following her resignation as chairman of scandal-hit AMP.

Ms Brenner quit the embattled financial services group last month after the banking royal commission heard AMP never gave customers advice for which they had paid, and then lied about it to regulators.

The Australian Shareholders' Association is calling on her to resign as a Coca-Cola Amatil director, citing her accountability for governance at a company that dealt unethically with customers.

Ms Brenner isn't due for re-election until Coca-Cola Amatil's 2019 AGM, but the ASA is urging shareholders to speak up and voice their concerns at this year's meeting on Wednesday.

The ASA said shareholder disquiet could be enough for the board to push Ms Brenner out.

The former AMP chair - who is also on the board of building products supplier Boral - has been a Coca-Cola Amatil director since 2008, is chair of the ASX-listed firm's risk and sustainability committee, and is on its audit and finance committee.

"ASA believes that directors represent shareholders' interests and we make our assessments based on the information to hand," the ASA said in its voting intentions.

"At this time we are unable to support Ms Brenner continuing to remain on the CCA board and call for her to resign from the board."

ASA monitor Roger Ashley believes most Coca-Cola Amatil shareholders will want Ms Brenner to resign in light of the AMP revelations heard at the royal commission.

The 169-year-old company could face criminal charges for misleading the regulator and has been hit with three class actions on behalf of investors after AMP's plummeting shares trimmed more than $2 billion off its market value.

"It is not as though there aren't any directors, or potential directors to step in," Mr Ashley told AAP on Tuesday.

"Someone with that hanging over them should not be in a position representing shareholders, at least until such time - if it does happen - that she is cleared."