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Doctors forced to operate on 'real life Popeye'

Yahoo News Australia and agencies
·2-min read

Oddball Russian bodybuilder dubbed the real life Popeye has undergone an operation to remove rotting flesh caused by injecting his biceps with liquid synthol to give him huge muscular looking arms.

Kirill Tereshin, 24, earned the cartoon-based moniker due to his beach ball-like biceps hanging off his otherwise skinny frame. The unusual look is the botched result of injecting his arms with synthol oil, which he shared in videos on Instagram where he has 350,000 followers.

Tereshin, who comes from the city of Pyatigorsk in the Russian region of Stavropol Krai, said he underwent the recent operation which was a second one to correct the problem and this time remove the dead muscle, and drain his arms of excess fluid caused by the synthol product.

“Guys, this is what my arm looks like. Two cuts, one scar has healed, this one has remained. I'm undergoing treatment, everything will be fine soon," he said.

Doctors were forced to operate to remove dead flesh and muscle from his body. Source: Newsflash/Australscope
Doctors were forced to operate to remove dead flesh and muscle from his body. Source: Newsflash/Australscope

In 2018, Tereshin admitted that the synthol in his biceps was causing serious health issues.

The injections reportedly caused tissue fibrosis followed by necrosis, seriously affecting his health, and doctors told him he was at risk of amputation.

Fortunately for the young Russian, he was able to have much of his rotting muscle and tissue removed in a number of ongoing ops.

The first op took place in November 2019, however doctors told him that he would need a series of procedures to remove all the damaged areas.

At the time of the first operation, he told media that he was feeling much better after initially losing the use of his arms and worrying that he might not be able to move them again.

He now hopes the latest round of operations will see him clear of any further physical health issues.

Australscope

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