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CBS All Access launches kids' programming, soon to include Nickelodeon shows

Sarah Perez

CBS's over-the-top streaming service, CBS All Access, is the latest to counter the threat from Disney+ by investing in children's programming. Today, the company is launching a kids' programming lineup including original shows and other library content. Plus, in one of the first major content integrations ahead of the ViacomCBS merger, the CBS streaming service will soon add a selection of Nickelodeon children's TV shows to its catalog.

The first Nickelodeon titles will roll out in January, the company says.

In August, CBS had announced plans to launch children's programming on its service by way of deals with WildBrain (formerly DHX Media) and Boat Rocker Studios. From WildBrain, CBS licensed the kids' TV series "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs," produced with Sony Pictures Animation. And from Boat Rocker, CBS licensed the new "Danger Mouse," produced with BBC Children's Productions.

The two shows are the first original children's series on the service, which today is better known for its original programming aimed at adults, like "Star Trek: Discovery," "The Good Fight," "The Twilight Zone," and soon "Star Trek: Picard."

Today, the two originals are now live for subscribers alongside a library of kids' content that includes "Bob the Builder," "Inspector Gadget," "Madeline," "Heathcliff," "The Adventures of Paddington Bear," and the original "Danger Mouse."

Over the next several weeks, CBS says it plans to grow its kids' library to over 1,000 episodes as more TV series are added.

"Bringing children’s programming to CBS All Access is a significant step toward providing even more value for our subscribers and now for their children as well," said Marc DeBevoise, President and COO, CBS Interactive, in a statement. "We’re bringing to market a fantastic roster of exclusive originals along with a library of marquee series for families, and we look forward to continuing to expand our children’s programming offering, especially with the future addition of incredible programming from Nickelodeon."

The company did not specify which titles from Nickelodeon would come to CBS All Access, but it's possible the lineup could include shows like "SpongeBob SquarePants" or "Dora the Explorer," which went over to Amazon Prime Video after Viacom pulled them off Netflix back in 2013. Today, some of the early seasons of those shows and others are available as part of Amazon Prime's free streaming perk, while later seasons can only be rented or purchased.

"Spongebob," "Dora," and other classic Nickelodeon kids' shows are not included in Nickelodeon's new agreement with Netflix, which is focused on new, original content using both well-known characters and all-new IP. According to The NYT, that deal was valued at $200 million.

It would make sense for CBS All Access to eventually absorb Viacom's kids' streaming service Noggin, which is where you can today find "Dora," along with other shows like "PAW Patrol," "Peppa Pig, "Team Umizoomi," "Wallykazam," "Bubble Guppies," "Rusty Rivets," "Blue's Clues," "Blaze," "Shimmer & Shine," "Max & Ruby," "Wonder Pets," "Nia Hao, Kai-Lan," and several others. This would round out CBS All Access as a more family-friendly streaming service with a wide catalog, which would help it to better compete with Netflix, Hulu and of course, Disney+.

As a combined entity, it doesn't make sense for ViacomCBS to ask its customer base to subscribe to both services or choose between them. And Noggin, in particular, doesn't make sense given the higher churn rate for a service which only appeals to families with younger kids -- who age out of the service after a few years. It would be better to put these shows in front of the larger CBS All Access audience, helping it to tout a larger catalog in marketing materials and attract a wider group of cord-cutting consumers.