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ACT has 25 virus cases after high testing

·2-min read

The ACT has recorded 25 new coronavirus cases, but there were no new infections reported in a Canberra hospital cluster after extensive testing was undertaken.

Most of the latest cases were linked to outstanding known infections but only three were in quarantine during their entire infectious period.

The count brought the total number of cases in the current outbreak to 750. Ten people are in hospital, four of them in intensive care and three requiring ventilation

ACT Health Minister Rachel Stephen-Smith told reporters on Sunday there was positive news on the outbreak at a Canberra hospital, where no new cases had been identified.

"More than 200 negative tests have so far been returned from both staff and patients," she said.

"I was advised this morning that all staff tests have now been returned and have come back negative. There will be more testing today, and the situation is being closely monitored."

Two virus cases had been reported last week in patients sharing a room at the hospital.

Ms Stephen-Smith said more than 4000 Canberrans came forward for COVID-19 testing in the 24-hour reporting period, a relatively high figure, particularly for a Saturday.

"We often see testing dropping off on the weekend, so to have that level of testing on a Saturday was outstanding," she said.

Meanwhile, the ACT has passed the 85 per cent first dose mark for people aged 12 and over.

The minister said there was a strong take up of the Moderna vaccine for 12 to 15 year olds.

"Over the last few days 12 to 15 year olds have accounted for about 45 per cent of Moderna vaccinations in pharmacies," she said.

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr said on Saturday that as regional NSW health services began feeling the burden of caseloads, some COVID-19 patients were being sent to ACT hospitals for treatment, a trend he expected to continue.

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