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3 Aussie sectors desperate for workers as job ads plummet

An electrician on a ladder installing wiring in a ceiling. Two healthcare workers laugh while wearing masks. A young woman engineer.
Job ads fell 4.1 per cent nationally, but there are still some industries that are in desperate need for workers (Source: Getty)

Despite rolling lockdowns there are still plenty of opportunities around the country, particularly in three sectors.

The Seek Job Ads Report for July found that while job ads fell 4.1 per cent around the country there are still industries that are in need of workers.

The top three industries with the most jobs ads on Seek right now are:

  • Trades & Services with roles in automotive trades, labourers, electricians, welders & boiler makers, technicians, carpentry & cabinet making, and hair & beauty services.

  • Healthcare & Medical with roles in physiotherapy, OT & rehabilitation, aged care nursing, dental, psychology, counselling & social work and general & surgical nursing.

  • Information & Communications Technology with roles for developers/ programmers, software engineers, help desk & IT support and programme & project management.

State-by-state breakdown

All states and territories, except Victoria, saw job ad growth decline in July, with NSW and South Australia being impacted the most.

“Job volumes in most states and territories fell in July, but with the exception of New South Wales, the country’s job ad volumes are 20.6 per cent higher than two years ago and as much as 67.1 per cent in the states and territories,” managing director of Seek ANZ Kendra Banks said.

“New South Wales saw the biggest reduction in the number of new job ads posted on SEEK.com.au in July, down by 14.2 per cent. Previous lockdowns in Victoria show that job ad volumes can bounce back quickly, and we hope to see a similar response in states facing restrictions at the moment.”

A graph showing the latest Seek Job ads data broken down from state to state.
Job ads are still significantly higher compared to last year (Source: Seek)

Industries struggling the most in lockdowns

The job ad data also shows that when lockdowns and restrictions are imposed, the same industries continue to be impacted.

Hospitality & Tourism, Trades & Services and Retail & Consumer Services job ad volumes fell back in July because they are largely made up of customer facing roles.

“New South Wales makes the largest contribution to job ad volumes, and its current lockdown is having a direct impact on national figures,” Banks said.

“The state’s top three industries showing a drop are also the top three industries in decline at a national level”.

The top three industries showing the greatest drop month on month job ad volume nationally and in NSW are:

  • Hospitality & Tourism which declined 30.7 per cent nationally and 63.3 per cent in New South Wales,

  • Trades & Services reduced by 6.9 per cent nationally and 24.8 per cent in New South Wales and,

  • Retail & Consumer Services fell by 7.8 per cent nationally and 29.6 per cent in New South Wales.

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